The Kitchen Designer

Sustainable Design and Living

empathy.jpgMore to think about today! When I went to Copenhagen in August, I visited the Danish Design Center. There is a permanent exhibition of a FLOWmarket, a market, divided into a mindset devoted to the examination of three categories of sustainable growth:

individual

collective

environmental flow

text1.jpg

 

A holistic point of view and movement toward sustainable growth needs to encompass these three categories.  More from the Danish Design Center:

"Sustainable growth is all about generating growth on more than just an economic and a technological level. Indeed, throughout the 20th century we have witnessed how a one-dimensional view on growth has resulted in a wide range of imbalances on 3
levels:

Man’s relation to himself (rising stress, depression, and obesity curves, addiction, eating disorders, information overload, “always-on-line”-syndromes, symptom treatment etc.)

Man’s relation to society (over-consumption, increasing violence, xenophobia, global inequality, cultural rectification, conflicts over resources, commercialisation etc.)

Man’s relation to nature (pollution, agricultural toxics, factory farming, decreasing bio-diversity etc.)

Phenomena that individually and together bear witness to an unhealthy development of our societies that we can and must seek to reverse - or at least reduce - and push in a more holistic direction."

Please take a look at the flikr slideshow of this exhibition, I found it to be very thought provoking and still do. And, here is another point of view from Apartment Therapy Green obout this exhibit. Take a look. 

How can this thinking be translated to remodeling one's kitchen? Actions can be taken toward thinking holistically about a project. From donating or selling one's cabinets rather than disposing of them, to seeking products made within a 500 mile radius, to searching for environmentally friendly products, and so much more, to be talked about in the coming days and beyond. I just wanted to share this insightful exhibition with you.

 

Posted by Susan serra, ckd
over 11 years ago

Sustainable Design and Living

empathy.jpgMore to think about today! When I went to Copenhagen in August, I visited the Danish Design Center. There is a permanent exhibition of a FLOWmarket, a market, divided into a mindset devoted to the examination of three categories of sustainable growth:

individual

collective

environmental flow

text1.jpg

 

A holistic point of view and movement toward sustainable growth needs to encompass these three categories.  More from the Danish Design Center:

"Sustainable growth is all about generating growth on more than just an economic and a technological level. Indeed, throughout the 20th century we have witnessed how a one-dimensional view on growth has resulted in a wide range of imbalances on 3
levels:

Man’s relation to himself (rising stress, depression, and obesity curves, addiction, eating disorders, information overload, “always-on-line”-syndromes, symptom treatment etc.)

Man’s relation to society (over-consumption, increasing violence, xenophobia, global inequality, cultural rectification, conflicts over resources, commercialisation etc.)

Man’s relation to nature (pollution, agricultural toxics, factory farming, decreasing bio-diversity etc.)

Phenomena that individually and together bear witness to an unhealthy development of our societies that we can and must seek to reverse - or at least reduce - and push in a more holistic direction."

Please take a look at the flikr slideshow of this exhibition, I found it to be very thought provoking and still do. And, here is another point of view from Apartment Therapy Green obout this exhibit. Take a look. 

How can this thinking be translated to remodeling one's kitchen? Actions can be taken toward thinking holistically about a project. From donating or selling one's cabinets rather than disposing of them, to seeking products made within a 500 mile radius, to searching for environmentally friendly products, and so much more, to be talked about in the coming days and beyond. I just wanted to share this insightful exhibition with you.

 

Posted by Susan serra, ckd
over 11 years ago

Green Kitchen Design Week!

I'm excited to start this week out on a green note! This week I will be talking about green design as it relates to kitchen design and general principles of the many ways there are to think green.

central%20park.jpgI'm happy today, to introduce you to Jeff Holloway, CKD, a force behind the new blog, K+BB Green.  It's a blog about greening our kitchens and baths. I'm late to the party introducing Jeff, although he and I have been talking since the summer! Busy schedules intervened, and I chose to wait to introduce his blog until after he attended the Green + Design Conference to hear his thoughts on the subject and connect to what he learned.

It's a blog I certainly will be watching with great interest, especially since we are both kitchen designers. I have been very remiss in writing about green kitchen design, and that will now change. There is so much to say about kitchens, other than green related topics, but, I feel privileged to have my blog as a platform to promote responsible issues such as this, and I will do much more on this issue. In that regard, I will be attending my third seminar on green kitchen design soon. I'm finding that the more I know, the more I care about the issue.

Here are a few posts about the recent conference that Jeff wrote. First is about The Lazy Environmentalist.  And, another post on first impressions.

Here's what Jeff wrote to me as a general introduction to his blog, K+BB Green:

Time To Rethink Green, by Jeff Holloway, CKD

The design community is too focused on the products of green. This feel-good approach is not going to be effective over time. Product choices are driven by trends, trends are fashion and fashion goes out of style.
 
Specifying green products into our designs is a great start, but designers should focus more on the actual issues that have created awareness for sustainable design and then implement products and practices that can contribute to a solution. There is a lot more to this than choosing sustainable flooring, cabinets and countertops.
 
The commercial building industry gets it. The LEED guidelines that they use to help design their buildings work. Instead of requiring the use of certain products or even construction techniques, the program sets certain goals for buildings. For example, a building gains points for achieving a certain percentage of water or energy reduction compared to non-green buildings. So architects and designers are forced to look at the project as a whole rather than the individual parts specified.  We can learn a lot if we look at what LEED has accomplished.
 
Green design is much more than compact florescent lights and the latest and greatest countertop materials fabricated from recycled material. Designers should be specifying green products for some other reason then the proverbial “because we think it’s the right thing to do.” We need to educate ourselves about the why and then implement a plan that helps us design environments that keep our clients healthy while conserving our resources.

 

kbb%20green.jpg 

Posted by Susan serra, ckd
over 11 years ago

A New Look!

It's fall, and finally, the temperatures are dipping, ok, slowly...at 11 pm, it's 62 degrees! Yet, we know the cool weather is coming, the leaves are indeed falling, and I like to do seasonal changes to the blog. The same image, tweaked. Likewise, other details tweaked as well. Now, it's a cozy feeling I'm looking for, one to make you want to, well, maybe start cooking those comfort foods, using the oven and crockpot once again. I'm getting in the fall mood.

Of course, being the tortured designer I am, you may see some tweaks in the days ahead until I get it right in my mind. I'm going to start lighting candles tomorrow. The winter solstice will see a lightening and brightening, but until then, it's all about warmth and that cozy feeling.

Posted by Susan serra, ckd
over 11 years ago

A Trip To A Kitchen Show

brown%20cabinets.jpgI went to a regional kitchen show on Tuesday and part of Wednesday in Pennsylvania. I go to this show every year. It's small, very small, but I always find some interesting materials or products, and information from seminars, so I go (to the crummy hotel room in King of Prussia, PA.)

In terms of trends, what I saw was DARK cabinetry, whether it be black (lots of black!) or very dark brown wood finishes. I saw some white, but not much, but that doesn't mean anything. I did see some exotic wood door samples and displays, clearly a trend for some time now. 

wood%20countertop.jpgI saw beautiful wood countertops in a good selection of woods that were very impressive, including bamboo and lyptus, among others. I also saw a great soapstone display and had a good refresher conversation about soapstone. It's soft, yet non porous. And, it's all about regular oiling, to maintain an even patina (the positive word for wear marks!)  

One booth I almost missed was a tiny booth showing Sirius hoods that I have used before. They just came out with a great hood for a small application. The hood is 24" wide. Great for apartment or small kitchens.

sirius%20hood.jpgAnd, the very best part of the show was that I got to meet Erinn from The Happy Living Blog! I knew she lived in the area near the show, and I sent her an email and asked if she was free, and to my delight, she was. We had dinner together and had such a really nice visit.

Try it...if you know a blogging buddy may be in a particular area you are visiting, take a chance and make the effort to meet. It's well worth it. Erinn is an architect, so we talked shop for quite awhile (we both agreed it's great to have allied professionals actually talk to one another!) and had an all around good time.

 

 

bamboo.jpg 

 happy%20living.jpg

Posted by Susan serra, ckd
over 11 years ago
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